“The Pajama Game” review

Senior+Madeline+Chestnut+balances+an+apple+on+her+head+during+%22The+Pajama+Game.%22+Chestnut+played+the+role+of+Babe+Williams%2C+the+head+of+the+Grievance+Committee.
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“The Pajama Game” review

Senior Madeline Chestnut balances an apple on her head during

Senior Madeline Chestnut balances an apple on her head during "The Pajama Game." Chestnut played the role of Babe Williams, the head of the Grievance Committee.

Kristina Foster

Senior Madeline Chestnut balances an apple on her head during "The Pajama Game." Chestnut played the role of Babe Williams, the head of the Grievance Committee.

Kristina Foster

Kristina Foster

Senior Madeline Chestnut balances an apple on her head during "The Pajama Game." Chestnut played the role of Babe Williams, the head of the Grievance Committee.

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As the lights dimmed in the auditorium, I thought, “This will probably be a cheesy play all about pajamas.”

I soon found out that I was dead wrong.

“The Pajama Game” was much more than a simple bedtime story; it was an in-depth tale of the going-on’s of a pajama factory.

At the beginning, Sid Sorokin (junior Sam Hay), new superintendent at the Sleep-Tite Pajama Factory, falls in love with Babe Williams (senior Madeline Chestnut), the head of the Grievance Committee. However, they have a falling out after Sorokin doesn’t want to raise workers’ wages.

Later, Sorokin realizes the workers deserve more pay and helps them get the raise. Williams forgives Sorokin, and they fall in love once again.

The acting helped to tell the story in an entertaining way. Characters would crack jokes and make fools of themselves. Senior Christopher Hatfield’s character even stripped down to his underwear in order to get the crowd to laugh.

Along with stellar acting, the music was fantastic too, an ensemble, composed of Free State students and professional musicians, provided enjoyable background music to songs like “Racing with the Clock,” “There Once Was a Man” and “7 1/2 Cents,” which stuck out above the rest.

Other than these pieces, Hay and Chestnut’s solos and duets were phenomenal. Their strong voices captured the audiences attention and warranted their lead roles.

The crackling microphones, which is not to be blamed on the performers, caused some distractions from the music. Other than that, I thought it was a great performance and would not mind spending a few more hours rewatching the whole thing.

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