The student-run news site of Lawrence Free State High School

Free Press Online

The student-run news site of Lawrence Free State High School

Free Press Online

The student-run news site of Lawrence Free State High School

Free Press Online

Meet the Staff
Ava Talbott
Ava Talbott
Reporter

Ava is a sophomore at Free State and is a reporter for Free State Journalism. She also participates in choir and tennis. In her spare time, she enjoys hanging out with friends.

FEATURE: Causes and Effects of Snow Days

Impacts of snow days on students and staff
Covered+in+snow%2C+the+school+building+sits+empty+as+students+stay+home+due+to+unsafe+weather+conditions+on+January+16.+%0A
Mallory Thompson
Covered in snow, the school building sits empty as students stay home due to unsafe weather conditions on January 16.

For students, snow days can offer a unique opportunity for students to focus on their personal lives and enjoy a day to themselves.

So far, the Lawrence school district has had four snow days in 2024. According to Julie Boyle, the district uses many factors to determine a snow day. Some of the things that make the district call a snow day include low temperatures, the inability to properly heat buildings, mechanical issues in diesel-fueled vehicles and the overall road conditions.

“Extremely low temperatures pose a health risk to students who may be waiting at bus stops or walking to school,” Julie Boyle said.

Snow day weather can be dangerous, but they have the potential to improve a student’s mental health by giving them a day to focus on themselves. Seniors Blake Wohler and Lucas Sola enjoy snow days because they give them a day to do what they please.

Wohler said that snow days make the school year more enjoyable because you never know when you might have one. He said that snow days help to improve his overall attitude about school by giving him a day to relax.

“Sometimes everything about school can stress people out,” Sola said. “It helps a lot of people to have the day off.”

While snow days do provide students with a unique opportunity to focus on themselves and relax a little, the constant interruptions to the school week can make it harder for both students and teachers. Studies show that snow days don’t harm test scores, though they can still make it hard for students to get back into the rhythm of school.

“It’s made it super hard to come back here and kind of get in the swing of things,” Lucas Sola said.

Snow days can also have a big effect on a teacher’s curriculum. For some teachers, snow days come as a welcome day to plan extra lessons or take the day off. Other teachers such as math teacher Annette McDonald face pressure to get students ready for AP tests that happen on the same day regardless of snow days.

“[Snow days] stressed me out because I feel with the advanced placement classes that we’re always pressed for time,” McDonald said. “I’ve scheduled it all out so that we have two weeks to prepare or extra practice just to get ready for the exam, you know, reviewing. And every snow day I lose a day and…four days and I’ve lost a week.”

McDonald decided to combat the lack of time by continuing to assign work on snow days. Calculus BC student Sola doesn’t feel like it’s fair to be given work on snow days. He feels like they should be given the day off to relax and just mentally reset.

“I’ve talked to so many people and nobody really does it,” Sola said. “If you have a snow day you’re not doing homework. You’re just relaxing or taking the day off.”

About the Contributors
Jonah Frye
Jonah Frye, Reporter

Jonah Frye is a sophomore at Free State and is a reporter for Free State Journalism. He also runs track and cross country for Free State. Outside of school he enjoys running, exploring nature, traveling, and trying adventure sports.

Mallory Thompson
Mallory Thompson, News Photo Editor
Mallory Thompson is a junior at Free State. This is her second year on staff and she is Photo Editor for the Free Press Newspaper and Online. Outside of journalism, Mallory is involved in LINK Crew, National Honor Society, and the Student Library Advisory Board.
Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

All Free Press Online Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *